SC State bringing 400,000 more textbooks to African schools

Thursday, October 25, 2007

New grant will provide more than one million textbooks for 300 secondary schools

The SC State University Textbooks and Learning Materials Program has received an additional $2 million from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to write and publish secondary school textbooks for the children of Tanzania.ORANGEBURG –
The SC State University Textbooks and Learning Materials Program has received an additional $2 million from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to write and publish secondary school textbooks for the children of Tanzania.

“This award comes on top of the initial $3 million grant awarded in 2005 by the agency to develop, publish and distribute a minimum of 600,000 textbooks, laboratory manuals, posters and training modules to be provided to all the 300 secondary schools in Zanzibar, Tanzania,” said Dr. Leonard McIntyre, program director and dean of the College of Education, Humanities and Social Sciences.

SC State and the Ministry of Education and Vocational Training of Zanzibar are working together to develop six textbooks in three science subjects. The biology, chemistry and physics textbooks and supplemental materials are for students at the secondary level, where textbooks often are outdated or are in short supply.

The new funds will allow SC State to expand the service area of the Textbooks and Learning Materials Program to include the regions of Lindi and Mtwara on the Tanzania mainland. The incremental funding will provide an additional 400,000 textbooks and other teaching materials.

“The South Carolina State Textbooks and Learning Materials Program team, comprised mainly of faculty from the Department of Education, and lead writers, is excited about this new opportunity to broaden the scope of its work to include mainland Tanzania,” said Lamin Drammeh, program manager.

SC State is one of six U.S. universities chosen by USAID to partner with an African nation to implement the Textbooks and Learning Materials Program, a part of President George W. Bush’s effort to expand access to education in Africa.

President Bush’s Africa Education Initiative, a program of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), is a $600 million commitment to provide books, scholarships, school uniforms and teacher training so that more African children can attend school. The initiative includes funding to train 920,000 teachers in 20 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. By the beginning of 2006, more than 300,000 teachers, both new and experienced, had received training.